Bridging and enriching cultures


A kitchen is both fun and magical. You can hypnotize yourself staring at an open flame, while at the same time you are in the middle of a family gathering where everyone is participating in one way or another: cutting vegetables, stirring the soup, making tortillas, scrubbing pots, and finally delighting in the results. The kitchen contains a combination of some of the seven deadly sins: gluttony, lust, sloth, pride, greed, and envy, as well as every human emotion, desire, and whim, combined with personal bonds, all creating a profound interrelationship of color, flavor, rhythm, and intensity. We need the combustible materials that set our intellect, our imagination, and our feelings on fire. All of this gives each dish its surprising textures and tastes and its subtle transformation of elements into aphrodisiacs and new sensations.

This is the reason I want to maintain and continue to develop, to whatever extent possible, the ancestral recipes of our both our pre-hispanic and traditional heritage, which, fusing with the new ingredients and flavors that arrived from Europe, enrich what we now know as Mexican cuisine and which I have inherited starting in my mother’s womb. Combined with my most recent food experiences involving a variety of flavors, I want to keep alive all of the taste memories registered on my palate. For these reasons I applaud an event which should have taken place a long time ago: the recognition by UNESCO of Mexican Gastronomy as an Intangible World Heritage.

It is of the utmost importance for me to re-establish the value of Mexican gastronomy as an important part of our identity, despite the losses that occur as families separate and migration becomes transnational, but this also gives us the chance to inject worldwide cultures into our identity, enriching our language, values, and customs.

I now find myself living abroad, changing into a transnational, and living in two countries and two cultural contexts simultaneously, I understand that our obligation here is to make sure our children feel proud to be Mexican. This is the role of food in the question of identity: we are what we eat. This gastronomy gives us the sense of belonging that is not tied to any concrete land or territory.


A kitchen is both fun and magical. You can hypnotize yourself staring at an open flame, while at the same time you are in the middle of a family gathering where everyone is participating in one way or another: cutting vegetables, stirring the soup, making tortillas, scrubbing pots, and finally delighting in the results. The kitchen contains a combination of some of the seven deadly sins: gluttony, lust, sloth, pride, greed, and envy, as well as every human emotion, desire, and whim, combined with personal bonds, all creating a profound interrelationship of color, flavor, rhythm, and intensity. We need the combustible materials that set our intellect, our imagination, and our feelings on fire. All of this gives each dish its surprising textures and tastes and its subtle transformation of elements into aphrodisiacs and new sensations.

This is the reason I want to maintain and continue to develop, to whatever extent possible, the ancestral recipes of our both our pre-hispanic and traditional heritage, which, fusing with the new ingredients and flavors that arrived from Europe, enrich what we now know as Mexican cuisine and which I have inherited starting in my mother’s womb. Combined with my most recent food experiences involving a variety of flavors, I want to keep alive all of the taste memories registered on my palate. For these reasons I applaud an event which should have taken place a long time ago: the recognition by UNESCO of Mexican Gastronomy as an Intangible World Heritage.

It is of the utmost importance for me to re-establish the value of Mexican gastronomy as an important part of our identity, despite the losses that occur as families separate and migration becomes transnational, but this also gives us the chance to inject worldwide cultures into our identity, enriching our language, values, and customs.

I now find myself living abroad, changing into a transnational, and living in two countries and two cultural contexts simultaneously, I understand that our obligation here is to make sure our children feel proud to be Mexican. This is the role of food in the question of identity: we are what we eat. This gastronomy gives us the sense of belonging that is not tied to any concrete land or territory.

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